The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America



The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town AmericaHet Verloren Continent Is Een Hilarisch, Scherpzinnig En Ontluisterend Portret Van Het Hedendaagse Amerika Na De Dood Van Zijn Vader Maakt Bill Bryson Een Reis Door De Verenigde Staten Op Zoek Naar Het Land Van Zijn Jeugd Hij Begint En Eindigt Zijn Tocht In Zijn Geboortestad Des Moines, Iowa En Bezoekt Onderweg Achtendertig Staten.

William McGuire Bill Bryson, OBE, FRS was born in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1951 He settled in England in 1977, and worked in journalism until he became a full time writer He lived for many years with his English wife and four children in North Yorkshire He and his family then moved to New Hampshire in America for a few years, but they have now returned to live in the UK.In The Lost Continent, Bil

➪ The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America Read ➲ Author Bill Bryson – Josephfedericonjmet.us
  • Paperback
  • The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America
  • Bill Bryson
  • Dutch
  • 03 September 2018
  • 9789050930840

10 thoughts on “The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America

  1. Leftbanker says:

    The Lost Continental A Look at Bill Bryson Bill Bryson s travel books are mostly like this one, a constant whining about everything His other books I love It s not that I don t get the humor in this book, I just think that it isn t funny, not in the least I should also say that I have lived a full one quarter of my life outside of the United States and I don t care if someone makes fun of anything and everything American I ve done a bit of bashing myself. A dyspeptic man in his middle thirties, whose constant bad mood seems like someone in their mid seventies, drives around the U.S and complains about absolutely everything he sees, smells, hears, and eats If this sounds like your idea of a good time, read Bill Bryson s The Lost Continent Travels in Small Town America Abacus, 1990.He constantly mocks small towns in America by referring to them by such names as Dog Water, Dunceville, Urinal, Spigot, and Hooterville and this is in the first five pages Don t worry about the intrepid insulter running out of clever names for hick towns Bryson has a million of them and he uses every single one.The only things about which Bryon has a favorable view are natural wonders and the homes of rich people He marvels at the obscenely posh residences of ultra wealthy, early 20th century industrialists on Mackinac Island which were built before income taxes and most labor laws He would probably be thrilled with pre revolutionary France or Czarist Russia One of hi...

  2. Gary says:

    It s funny how so many Americans begin their reviews of The Lost Continent with statements such as I loved Bryson s other books but this one is terrible , all because he treats America the same way as he treats everywhere and everyone else.So while many Americans think it s acceptable hilarious, even for Bryson to make disparaging but witty comments about non Americans and the places they call home, it is an utter outrage for him to be anything other than completely worshipful with regard to America and Americans.The unavoidable, undeniable fact of the matter is that Bill Bryson s The Lost Continent is not only one of his finest works, but one of the best books ever written by anyone in recent times about the USA and Americans.It is as funny as anything you ll ever read, as well as being touching, poignant and fascinating It is the first book I ve read since Neither Here Nor There also by Bryson that ha...

  3. Jeff says:

    In which a bilious Bryson, returning to the U.S after living in England, borrows his mom s car with her permission and sets out to find the perfect American small town.Bryson kind of loses focus of his main task along the way, but that doesn t prevent him from slinging his jibes at 38 of the lower U.S states.This one s almost as funny as the other Bryson books I ve read, but he seems to have a stick up his b...

  4. Nandakishore Varma says:

    I come from Des Moines Somebody had to. Thus begins Bill Bryson his travelogue, setting the tone for what is going to follow he is a smart aleck, and he is going to be at his sarcastic best in taking down small town America through which he is going to travel.Des Moines in Iowa is a typical small town in America where nothing ever happens and nobody ever leaves, because that is the only life they have known and they are happy with it But not so young Bill he watched one TV show on Europe when he was ten and was consumed with a desire to become European After a steady diet of National Geographics during his adolescence, Bryson left for England and settled there However, during his middle age, he was filled with a sense of nostalgia for small town America, and the journeys he had across them with his family as a child.Bryson s father was an inveterate traveller who compulsively took his family on vacations every year These would have been extremely enjoyable except for two ...

  5. Tommy says:

    Well, ain t it somethin for dat rascally Mr Bryson wit all o dat funny Northern talk to make his way down here to Dixie and spend some time wid us We sure do ppreciate you takin us into your rich and well knowed book, Mr Bryson And yer gosh darn right, God save all those poor folk who done s...

  6. Ciara says:

    This is the worst book ever Bryson is a fat, cynical white guy traveling around the country, proclaiming in the subtitle Travels in Small Town America But like most fat white guys, Bryson is scared of small town America He hates every small town he comes to whether they re on Indian reservations, small farming communities in Nebraska, southern towns full of African Americans where the author is too scared to even stop the car, or small mining communities in West Virginia, also where the author is too scared to stop How can you write a book about small town America when you re too scared to stop in any small towns His favorite towns Pittsburg and Charlotte Definitely small in my world Driving through the north woods, crossing the border from Maine to New Hampshire The skies were still flat and low, the weather cold, but at least I was out of the montony of the Maine woods In Littleton, on the Vermont border People on the sidewalk smiled at me as I passed This was beginning to worry me Nobody, even in America, is that friendly What did they want from me At a cemetery in Vermont I stood there in the mile October sunshine, feeling so sorry for all these lukles speople and their lost lives, reflecting bleakly on mortality and my own dear, cherished family so far away in England, and I th...

  7. Vanessa says:

    I do like my arm chair travelling with a hint of cynicism and much like Australians who are expert at taking the Mickey out of ourselves it was refreshing to see an American being able to take the piss.He may not be politically correct but who hasn t had a variation of the same thoughts going through their head about other tourists when travelling through touristy hot spots I can t express how much I enjoyed hearin...

  8. Claire says:

    Sometimes I feel like I m the only person who s noticed the fact that Bill Bryson is a smug bastard who casts a pall of depressing sarcasm over everything he writes about I mean, I m all for sarcasm in most cases, but it s as though all of his subjects are cheapened and made despicable by his prose In The Lost Continent, he turns every small town inhabitant into an ignorant, obnoxious caricature The book has virtually nothing to offer, unless you, too, are hel...

  9. Zuberino says:

    Bryson does two things very well in this book, besides his trademark humour which is happily a constant in this and every other book he s ever written He captures the spirit of the land at a very specific time in its recent history 1987, the high water mark of the Reaganite project Time and again, he is left demoralized by the mindless affluenza that was the hallmark of American society during the latter half of the 1980s More broadly, Bryson leaves a depressingly accurate description of the tawdriness and vulgarity of America s built environment a cement desert of motels, burger joints, gas stations, strip malls, freeways and parking lots repeated ad nauseam throughout the Lower 48 that is painfully recognizable even 25 years later If you have ever wondered at the wanton debasement that has been visited on the land by its greedy natives, if you have ever been saddened by the pitiless ugliness that surrounds you in America ...

  10. ~☆~Autumn♥♥ says:

    I have been to many of the places in the west that he traveled to in this book and it was interesting to me to read about his experiences which were so different to what I experienced We had a great breakfast in Sundance, WY and the waitress was so super nice and cheerful that I actually purchased a t shirt to remember her Bill Bryson did not get to eat there as The Shriners had taken over and the waitress would not help him I don t find the west to be like his experience at all but overall I don t care for Wyoming especially if you travel it east to west South to north is fine and Yellowstone in the early spring is wonderful before it gets too crowded I thought Yosemite was beautiful but I did have to agree with him about how disorganized it is and would never go back there again for this reason He uses too much bad language as usual and it annoyed me in this book His constant nasty comments about wo...

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