Emma



EmmaAn Unstoppable Combination Alexander McCall Smith And Jane Austen, As Sandy Modernizes The Story Of Emma Woodhouse Emma Woodhouse S Widowed Father Is An Anxious Man, Obsessed With Nutrition And The Latest Vitamins He Lives The Life Of A Country Gentleman In Contemporary England, Protectively Raising His Young Daughters, Isabella And Emma While Isabella Grows Into A Young Woman, Marries A Society Photographer For Vogue At The Age Of 19 And Gets Down To The Business Of Reproducing Herself, Emma Pursues A Degree In Interior Design At University In Bath, And Then Returns To Set Up Shop In Her Home Village With Her Educated Eye For The Coordination Of Pattern And Colour, Emma Thinks She Can Now Judge What Person Would Best Be Paired With Another, And Sets About Matchmaking Her Young Friend, Harriet, With Various Possible Suitors Little Does She Know She Is Not The Only Person Encouraging Romantic Pairings In The Village As Emma S Cupid Like Curiosity About Her Neighbours, Both Young And Old, Moves Her To Uncover Their Deeper Motives, She Is Forced To Confront A Few Surprising Truths About Her Own.

www.alexandermccallsmith.com, on

[Ebook] Emma By Alexander McCall Smith – Josephfedericonjmet.us
  • ebook
  • 352 pages
  • Emma
  • Alexander McCall Smith
  • 19 February 2017
  • 9780345809087

10 thoughts on “Emma

  1. Leah says:

    Not with a bang but a whimperI wouldn t have thought it possible for any of these Austen Project books to reach lower depths than Joanna Trollope s Sense Sensibility, but I fear this one does After Val McDermid s surprisingly enjoyable take on Northanger Abbey, I hoped the series might be capable of redemption I was wrong There are some MILD SPOILERS aheadThe first few pages are quite fun with lots of little jokes about class and McCall Smith s hometown of Edinburgh But it s a false dawn very quickly the book descends into a miserable and poorly written attempt to make Austen s observations about class relevant to today s society.The characterisation is dreadful Emma may have been unlikeable in the original, but one can see why she got away with it Firstly, she is superficially pleasant and, secondly, she is socially superior to everyone she meets and they are conditioned by society to respect her In this version, she s simply a nasty, selfish, small minded piece of work, to whom no one in the real world would give the time of day Her main belief seems to be that women should set out to catch a rich husband so that they don t need...

  2. Phrynne says:

    After a couple of real disasters I promised myself I would not read any books from the Austen Project Then along came my favourite Austen novel Emma rewritten by one of my favourite authors Alexander McCall Smith and how could I resist And I am so glad I didn t because I loved this book McCall Smith chose to write the story exactly as Austen did just putting it in a modern time frame and expanding a little on the characters back stories and their behaviours It is all written in Alexander McCall Smith s inimical style and I enjoyed every single word Okay sometimes I could hear Isobel Dalhousie speaking instead of ...

  3. Melindam says:

    Badly done Badly done indeed Mild Spoilers ahead One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other I am sorry to say that I found this book extremely disappointing Alexander McCall Smith while grasping the issues of Emma by Jane Austen on a certain, superficial level seems to have totally missed out on all the fine points in his attempt at translating this perfect work of art into modern.The book has 2 major and several minor drawbacks One is that it completely lacks the relationship dynamics that drove the original book forward the relationship between Emma Mr Knightley, Frank Churchill, Jane Fairfax are almost non existent It is barely surprising as Mr K., Frank and Jane hardly feature in the book at all and when they do, the scenes are lame, boring and unrealistic Long pages are given up to lengthy, uninteresting background stories of all characters, but almost none for them to interact with each other And when they do, it leaves you nonplussed as to why AMS bothered The characters have either been unrecognisably changed Isabella and John Knightley and even Anne Taylor or dumbed down to an unbearable level George Knightley can hardl...

  4. Katie says:

    Ummm.Well, for starters, this was a very mean book because it seemed okay for the first half of the book, so by the time I grew disgusted with it, I was committed and wanted to see how it turned out Because even though it s a retelling, I had my doubts about how it would end And this book has probably important probl...

  5. Julie Bestry says:

    This is a well written but not very good book Stay with me here Of the various Austen Project books, I d say it s the least awful, which is, I suppose, praising with faint damnation Alexander McCall Smith writes very well That isn t the problem There s a brief section in the backstory of John and George Knightley where we learn that the parents divorced and the mother, who stayed on at Donwell, eventually met a man with whom she traveled, and the paragraph is intriguing, as if it could have been a story all of its own It was on one of these trips, a visit to an international bridge tournament in Kerala, that she was hit by a car an old Hindustan Ambassador with minimal brakes and died Her last memories were of the sun above her so brilliant, so unrelenting and concerned faces looking down on her a boy wearing a blue shirt, a man in a khaki uniform who was shouting at the others and then the sun again, and darkness.And yet this has nothing to do with Emma Woodhouse or Emma, nor even much to do with the backstory of George Knightley, whom McCall Smith seems to make into a drudge and then forget even so than Austen might have He has a brief scene with Mr Woodhouse, then a few , and perhaps one argument with Emma, and then one other, and then the ending is eventually sprung on the rea...

  6. Jamie says:

    itriedI wanted to love it, I really did I have loved all incarnations of this character, from Austen s own to Clueless to the BBC adaptions to Emma Approved Butthis just didn t capture any charm for me and if you re going to revamp an Austen novel, you better have bucket loads of charm, clever banter and character development that goes beyond a few expositional paragraphs told from too many perspectives This story felt like it was being told using literary elements right out of the 19th century which doesn t interest me because I ve already read a version of Emma from the 19th century the original The unnecessarily dense and action less prose without an ounce of the wit and underlying sweetness that Emma should have just wasn t engaging enough, though technically well written It s not that Smith s societal observations were un Emma esque or boring, it s that they weren t delivered in a way that excited me.If you re...

  7. Jon McKnight says:

    ALEXANDER McCall Smith is a brave man A very brave man How else can you explain his willingness, indeed his eagerness, to meddle with Emma, one of the most cherished of Jane Austen s novels It s true that Mr McCall Smith left the country almost immediately after his modern retelling of Emma hit the bookshops, but I m told his decision to publish and be absent wasn t an indication of doubt on his part as to the novel s critical reception but was actually because he needed to embark on a promised US book tour.He was nevertheless prepared to risk his considerable reputation on what can only be seen as a high stakes venture.Millions of readers around the world regard Miss Austen s novels with a reverence usually reserved for the works of Shakespeare, and woe betide anyone who thinks they could make a better job of them.To even try to do so, whether you disguise it as a modern retelling or not, would have been viewed by many of Miss Austen s characters as an unforgivable impertinence.Yet and this is an important yet , Mr McCall Smith succeeds Admirably.Miss Austen, having perished at the age of 41, isn t here to tell us what she thinks of this modern version of Emma, but I would venture to suggest that she d love it.She would almost certainly be a fan of Alexander McCall Smith anyway, not least because of his love of the English language, the dexterity of his prose, and the playfulness with which he writes all qualities for which she was feted herself.Her boo...

  8. Susan Johnson says:

    This is the third book in the Austen Project and I really had high hopes Alexander McCall Smith writes one of my favorite series, The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency, and I thought he might bring the needed warmth to the story It was a good book, pleasant to read, but nothing special It struggles with the juxtaposition of Emma in modern times Part of the problem is not the author s fault It is just disconcerting to see Emma with a cell phone and an e mail The character still interact with the stiff formality of the original books which is just odd in modern times It s hard to see adults addressed with their surnames while they text out a message When Emma suggests Harriet Smith break her date with the son of a local B B, she encourages her to do it by text message I just think that s out of character In this day and age, is it really a terrible th...

  9. Helle says:

    I m not sure a modern take on Austen s classic was a good idea in this case McCall Smith didn t exactly murder Emma, but he turned her it into something rather silly that bore little resemblance to Austen s wonderful original I have enjoyed McCall Smith s books previously, his gentle, humorous musings on life in either Edinburgh or Botswana, but this was a disappointment There were some OK scenes here and there but too many inane conversations and too many changes that didn t result in a modern take, in my opinion, but rather in a version that strayed too far from Austen s Emma Not sure if I should tackle other novels in this Austen Project which Val McDermid and Joanna Trollope have ...

  10. Kaya Dimitrova says:

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