The Loney



The LoneyIf It Had Another Name, I Never Knew, But The Locals Called It The Loney That Strange Nowhere Between The Wyre And The Lune Where Hanny And I Went Every Easter Time With Mummer, Farther, Mr And Mrs Belderboss And Father Wilfred, The Parish Priest.It Was Impossible To Truly Know The Place It Changed With Each Influx And Retreat, And The Neap Tides Would Reveal The Skeletons Of Those Who Thought They Could Escape Its Insidious Currents No One Ever Went Near The Water No One Apart From Us, That Is.I Suppose I Always Knew That What Happened There Wouldn T Stay Hidden For Ever, No Matter How Much I Wanted It To No Matter How Hard I Tried To Forget

Andrew Michael Hurley born 1975 is a British writer whose debut novel, The Loney, was published in a limited edition of 278 copies on 1 October 2014 by Tartarus Press and was published under Hodder and Stoughton s John Murray imprint in 2015.

Read ✓ The Loney By Andrew Michael Hurley – Josephfedericonjmet.us
  • Paperback
  • 368 pages
  • The Loney
  • Andrew Michael Hurley
  • English
  • 16 July 2018

10 thoughts on “The Loney

  1. Imi says:

    This was a bit of an odd one Maybe my expectations were too high after all the praise I ve heard about it, but I didn t find myself connecting with this in the same way that others have Too much was left unexplained, meaning by the half way mark I was beginning to lose my patience, and I really struggled to see where the story was going The ending itself left me mystified I didn t realise going into this that there would be so much on religion, as it follows a devoutly I would say fanatically religious community Perhaps this is way I struggled to relate to it much It s also a hard book to describe not quite creepy enough to be called horror, and lacking a satisfying enough plot to be a thriller or mystery Saying that I really liked how the author wrote the characters, who were all well developed and realistic to the point that I took a real disliking to certain characters That was re...

  2. Michael Forester says:

    This shining star of a book has been so thoroughly praised I feel like a heretic in raising my lonely voice in disagreement Let me start, though, with what I enjoyed about The Loney Firstly, Andrew Hurley s prose is lucid and visual, evocative of the scenes he is describing to the extent that I felt unusually present in the narrative His characters are thoroughly well drawn and that s no easy accomplishment in a multi character novel like this He also manages to engender, from the beginning, an air of heart rate raising uneasiness It s a little like going to a horror movie you know nothing about You know something s going to happen, you re just not sure what In my opinion it is these two elements that carry you along, in spite of, rather than because of the plot By the time I was about half way through The Loney, I was begging to lose patience with the fact that little had actually happened Others will no doubt take the view that the first half of the book is necessary to the building of character I kind of go along with this, particularly as the characters are entirely and in some cases painfully believable However, I still get the impression that the book would have benefited from a rather ruthless editor with a big red pen There were too many plot threads that went undeveloped for my liking What did the existence of rifle actually contribute What was the benefit to the story of the narrator being able outrageousl...

  3. Emma says:

    Well deserved Costa First Novel Winner 2015 There s a lot that could have gone wrong in this book Every gothic horror motif you can think of forms part of the story, including moors crumbling old house dark and dank weather broken down vehicles woods voracious nature priests animal mutilation witches laughing rooks etc etc It is fuelled by myth and susperstition The Loney is personified, a character itself, full of malevolent will Death lives there natural or unnatural, it has become unremarkable.Yet is is precisely for this reason that Hurley is on everybody s one to watch list Because he made these work All together At once In the same story No wonder Stephen King was impressed His writing style is formidable, that this is a debut is ridiculous His words move the story beyond the plot into a feeling, an atmospher...

  4. Bill Kerwin says:

    I love many kinds of novels, but near the top of my list are the following scary novels, coming of age novels, novels with a sense of place, novels with a gothic atmosphere, well written novels, novels set in rural backwaters, novels featuring houses with secrets, novels with emotional depth, and novels which deal honestly with questions of faith in an age of eroding belief How lucky I was to have found The Loney, Andrew Michael Hurley s first novel His book is all the things listed above and .The novel is set in Lancashire in the north of England, on a desolate stretch of beach called The Loney, where a wild and useless length of English coastline features the dead mouth of a bay that filled and emptied twice a day, where the tide could come in quicker than a horse could run and every year a few people drowned It is 1975, and this Holy Week as in each preceding Holy Week a London working class family Mummer, Farther, and their two sons Hanny and Tonto , accompanied by a few friends and their parish priest, have come to make a pilgrimage to the local shrine of St Anne They come to fast, to pray, to confess their sins, and to look for God in the emerging springtime that, when it came,...

  5. Paromjit says:

    It begins with the discovery of a child s body Smith is the narrator of The Loney He is looking back on events from his childhood and they are presented with all the innocence of the time and non of the hindsight of the adult Drenched in atmosphere and relentlessly bleak, the Loney is an isolated, ominous and foreboding part of the northern coast where the incessant rain never stops The book draws on some of the best in gothic literature in its storytelling Smith who looks after his mute and numerously learning disabled brother, Andrew, are part of a Catholic pilgrimage They are accompanied by their parents, of whom Mummers looms particularly large, a newly appointed priest, Father Bernard, and others Mummers is convinced that Andrew will be cured The conviction in faith and ritual that underlies the tale and where it falls short is what drives the book The group are staying at the Moorings, owned by a taxidermist, which has its own secrets.Mummers is less than happy with the new younger priest who is accommodating in his faith The previous zealous, ritual obsessed pries...

  6. Maxine (Booklover Catlady) says:

    Astonishing literary fiction with a gothic dark undertone that had me alert from beginning to end I read this in hours, unable to put it down and it s a powerfully written novel that doesn t need a fast pace or out of this world twists or in your face horror to get the story across to you Mesmerising and disturbing.The Loney is a bleak place off the coast of Lancashire, England A place steeped in history, religious belief and dark undercurrents A pilgrimage is made back to this mournful place by a group of church goers and their new Parish Priest, what then unfolds is nothing short of imagination genius It s what is not said in this book that makes it so brilliant, it s the way you put pieces together and wonder if you ve arrived at the right conclusion.Miracles Bodies Death Superstition Hidden Rooms Th...

  7. LeAnne: GeezerMom says:

    Fantastic, dark read especially for Halloween and for those who are fans of the first season of True Detective, Just finished this for the second, maybe third time The slightly freaky build up in the first third has little tidbits you may not really note the first time through, but in hindsight, the first chapters contain foggy clues as to the nature of what is to come.ORIGINAL REVIEW The Loney has me A long, malevolent spit of sand reaching out into the cold Irish sea, the Loney also holds ancient dead and plenty of secrets in its depths Beautifully written, this novel entirely deserves all the awards its been crowned with The dark, gothic story weaves together pagan folklore and fervent Catholicism into a mourning shroud here The tale features two young brothers from London, one an altar boy and his elder who is mute and cognitively disabled For years, their devout parents and their parish priest have taken the boys to a windswept retreat to celebrate Easter week, but importantly to visit a shrine where healing waters are hoped to cure the boy who cannot speak It was our week of penitence and prayer in which we would make our confessions, visit Saint Anne s shrine, and look for God in the emerging springtime, that, when it came, was hardly a spring at all nothing so vibrant and effusive It was the soggy afterbirth of winter The remote old estate that the priest rents out was built by a wealthy gentleman wh...

  8. Ruth says:

    I struggled with this story I was never quite sure where it was going, or why it was going there I felt I should have been on edge than I was, and shocked than I actually felt It was dark, but not disturbing enough to really shock me, and ...

  9. Agnieszka says:

    I m always wary towards every ideology people try to force on me No matter what it may concern Religious beliefs, political views, approach to abortion laws, capital punishment, to what I should read, listen to, watch People have brains in order to use them, I guess I don t need preaching to be able to distinguish between good and evil, I don t want my taxes being spent on populist actions of politicians, I don t want to be threaten with every possible plague on the earth and hell fire after my death I don t Well, some of my words are neither here nor there considering the novel but my point is that there is a small group that creates really close community, with strong touch of religiousness I m reluctant to call them sect though sometimes their devotion had something very unhealthy under the surface I can understand that in such an insecure times, in such disfunctional balance in the world people need reassurance and encouragement Some people are strong enough on their own while others need support And there is a boy, Andrew, called Hanny He s mute and somewhat withdrawn, perhaps autistic though it s not defined Every year the group with their priest guide, father Wilfred, set off to the coastal Loney in kind of pilgrimage, to visit the remotely located sanctuary and pray for cure Andrew On the spot they used to stay at Moorings, an isolated and rather creepy house.I pretty disliked the mother of the boys, Andrew had a b...

  10. Johann (jobis89) says:

    Its walls had never contained a family No one had ever laughed there A group of religious pilgrims embark to the Loney, an isolated and stormy coastline located a few hours away from London in England, with the intention of visiting a shrine and curing Hanny, a mute teenage boy who suffers from severe learning disabilities.I ve been dreading writing this review simply because I don t know what to say It s a strange book, if someone asked me to give them a rundown of the plot it really wouldn t take very long and I m not even sure how I d go about explaining it So, as I ve described in the brief synopsis, a deeply religious family embark on a pilgrimage to the Loney, a bleak place off the coast of England, along with their parish priest, where they are seeking help for Hanny, who is mute The story is really about Hanny and his brother, who is the unnamed narrator Their relationship, and how they communicate, is one of the best things about the book Hurley seems to have a skill for intricate character development, as the members of the party who go to the Loney are quite distinct and easily recognisable So, that s one huge positive.Another positive is the beauty of Hurley s writing His descriptions of this stormy, wild landscape are breathtaking at times and really accentuate the gothic feel of this novel The desolate la...

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